Discovery of world’s oldest fossil suggests there was alien life on Mars

British scientists have found the remains of microbal bugs in what is the world’s oldest fossil suggesting similar organisms once existed on Mars.

The fossil, which was found in Quebec, Canada, shows life on earth was thriving as far back as 4.2 billion years, hundreds of millions of years earlier than previously thought.

This makes the prospect of life on the Red Planet a distinct possibility, as it was also bombarded with comets that are thought to have brought the building blocks of life to earth.

The bugs are believed to have thrived in a deep sea hydrothermal vent system – volcanic activity on the ocean floor.

Scientists, from University College London, believe the minieral-rich environment in the hot water surrounding the vent may have provided habitats for the early life form.

Embargoed to 1800 Wednesday March 1 Undated handout photo issued by UCL of haematite filament attached to a clump of iron (lower right), from hydrothermal vent deposits discovered in a rock formation in Quebec, Canada, known as the Nuvvuagittuq Supracrustal Belt (NSB). These clumps of iron and filaments were microbial cells and are similar to modern microbes found in vent environments. PRESS ASSOCIATION Photo. Issue date: Wednesday March 1, 2017. Remains of microbial bugs thought to be the oldest known on Earth have been unearthed by British scientists. See PA story SCIENCE Microfossils. Photo credit should read: Matthew Dodd/PA Wire NOTE TO EDITORS: This handout photo may only be used in for editorial reporting purposes for the contemporaneous illustration of events, things or the people in the image or facts mentioned in the caption. Reuse of the picture may require further permission from the copyright holder.

The haematite filament attached to a clump of iron from hydrothermal vent deposits in Quebec (Picture: Matthew Dodd/PA Wire)

Embargoed to 1800 Wednesday March 1 Undated handout photo issued by UCL of layer-deflecting bright red concretion of haematitic chert (an iron-rich and silica-rich rock), which contains tubular and filamentous microfossils, discovered in a rock formation in Quebec, Canada, known as the Nuvvuagittuq Supracrustal Belt (NSB). PRESS ASSOCIATION Photo. Issue date: Wednesday March 1, 2017. Remains of microbial bugs thought to be the oldest known on Earth have been unearthed by British scientists. See PA story SCIENCE Microfossils. Photo credit should read: Dominic Papineau/PA Wire NOTE TO EDITORS: This handout photo may only be used in for editorial reporting purposes for the contemporaneous illustration of events, things or the people in the image or facts mentioned in the caption. Reuse of the picture may require further permission from the copyright holder.

Scientists believe the discovery makes it likely life once existed on Mars (Picture: Dominic Papineau/PA Wire)

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